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Family Law

Tani Cantil-Sakauye completes the circle


Brazen arrogance of public servants whose work is not subjected to public scrutiny:

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En banc

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Look up en banc in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

En bancin bancin banco or in bank is a French term (meaning “on a bench“) used to refer to the hearing of a legal case where all judges of a court will hear the case (an entire “bench“), rather than a panel of them.[1][2] It is often used for unusually complex cases or cases considered to be of greater importance.[2] Appellate courts in the United States sometimes grant rehearing en banc to reconsider a decision of a panel of the court (a panel generally consisting of only three judges) where the case concerns a matter of exceptional public importance…

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… and yet they do not think that it would be appropriate, or necessary to explain their decisions.

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February 22, 2012 Posted by | Family Law, Law | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment